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Formula D interactive
We design interactive experiences
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    Museum and Visitor Centres

    Old Burger Street Prison

    Project Gateway - 2014

    As experienced museum exhibition designers, our team was commissioned to make the rich historical content at the Old Burger Street Prison in Pietermaritzburg accessible and appealing to a board audience. Employing innovative museum exhibit design solutions, a complete turnkey solution was provided with interactive displays and exhibits, a custom-built timeline touch screen table, interactive cue cards and a freedom game.
    Old Burger Street Prison Exhibits created by Formula D interactive


  • Old Burger Street Prison

    A site of exceptional historical significance, the Older Burger Street Prison museum exhibit design needed to maintain the original layout and harsh architecture features of the building while producing a compelling visitor experience. Our exhibit design team provided a complete turnkey solution, from concept to implementation and installation.

    A central attraction incorporated into the museum exhibit design is an interactive dialogue with one of the prison’s most famous prisoners: King Dinizulu kaChetshwayo. Visitors engage with a touch screen kiosk containing the list of accusations brought against Dinizulu during his trial for high treason and the king (brought to life on a high definition display) responds accordingly.

    The Satyagraha movement section houses a large interactive display featuring a timeline projected onto a digital glass-topped table.
    Multiple users can gather simultaneously and engage with and explore the history of Mahatma Gandhi and the events of the Satyagraha movement on the custom-built device.

    In Apartheid era section, the biographies and political associations of the prisoners that were held at Burger Street can be explored by visitors through interactive cue cards. Visitors to the museum can choose cards to lay on the interactive table which brings up related content and information.

    The museum tour ends with the opportunity to play the Freedom Game which asks difficult questions about human rights, freedom and security. The interactive learning application stores players’ feedback allowing visitors to compare their opinions and answers with past players.